Your perfect partner – green leafy & lush

Plants (living, fresh, healthy plants as opposed to dead or plastic dusty ones) bring nature into your home or  workplace and have the same positive effects as nature imagery: If A Picture Paints A Thousand Words Then What Do Your Walls Say About You?  In addition, plants contribute to our physical environment in a number of ways.

Firstly, plants absorb carbon dioxide and give out oxygen which is opposite to us humans who absorb oxygen and give out carbon dioxide.  The increased oxygen from plants will have a positive effect on our brain function as well as reduce our fatigue so are ideal in a workplace.  Plants also control humidity to a level that is beneficial for humans.  Therefore we are perfectly suited to live in harmony with plants. 

As well as oxygen plants give off negative ions.  These are found in the atmosphere and are noticeable in places that you associate with fresh air such as the sea or in a rural area away from roads and industry.  Positive ions are also found in the atmosphere and are given off by electrical equipment and manmade materials such as plastic or nylon.  Positive ions can cause fatigue and lower our immune system and we need to counteract them with negative ions.  Plants are therefore ideal to counter some of these effects and improve our wellbeing.

Finally plants take in gases that are noxious to humans and can have a purifying effect on the atmosphere.  Research carried out by  Dr BC Wolverton for NASA, attempting to create a breathable environment for a lunar habitat, found that houseplants are the best filters of common pollutants such as ammonia, formaldehyde, and benzene. These poisonous chemicals can be released by furniture, carpets and building materials, which are then often trapped by the ventilation systems in our workplaces.  This in turn can cause respiratory and allergic reactions for people working in these places.

Energetically, plants can also have a distinct effect depending on their species and are often used in Feng Shui to balance Yin & Yang energies. 

Cherish your plantsSo, befriend your plants and look after them because they can bring a lot to your relationship and it could be the start of something beautiful.

Jackie Notman is a copywriter, feng shui consultant and e-commerce retailer.  This article is from her blog ‘Life – and everything else’ where you’ll find an eclectic mix of articles and information.

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What Feng Shui is not

Some things are hard to define succinctly.  When somebody asks me what I do and I reply “I’m a Feng Shui consultant” people will understand it in a different way.  If they then ask me what it’s all about do I tell them it’s about how the environment affects their lives, or how their home fits into the landscape or how they can find love or good health or wealth? 

The thing is that Feng Shui is many things to many people, which is what makes it so fascinating.  However, there are some common thoughts of Feng Shui and what it is so I thought I’d start defining it by explaining what it is not: 

Zen meditation

Zen aims for enlightenment

 

Zen is a form of Buddhism where meditation is practised to achieve enlightenment

Feng Shui can help create a calm, relaxing place in which to meditate and, an understanding of Feng Shui will help you look at the world in a different way which is very enlightening. 

  

 

  

Minimalist room

Space doesn't suit everyone

 

Minimalism 

strips something down to its most fundamental features.  In terms of design or placement this can be seen as having little furniture and ornamentation in our homes and work places and ‘displaying’ what we do have.   

Where this suits some people, many of us prefer our environment to be expressive of our lives which often means anything but the bare essentials. 

Feng Shui supports this and advises on how to express your life in successful and positive ways through your decoration, ornamentation, artwork, images etc. 

 

  

Three legged toad

Will the toad bring you luck?

 

Three legged toads 

, just like four leaf clovers, are hard to find.  There’s nothing wrong with symbolising luck but Feng Shui doesn’t rely on superstition. 

Feng Shui analyses the types of energy in your home or workplace and advises on how you can make the most of the good stuff.  Feng Shui believes that you find positive energy.  It’s not about crossing your fingers and hoping. 

  

 

  

Small room

Best solutions on paper don't always work in reality

 

Disruptive.  

Being told that the best place for you to sleep in is the broom cupboard or you shouldn’t share a room with your partner is not realistic. 

A Feng Shui consultant takes account of your personal situation and works with you to find realistic solutions.  A Feng Shui consultant also understands that, sometimes, subtle is best. 

  

 

  

Demolishing a wall

Extreme Feng Shui?

 

Expensive.  

Re-position the front door or your life will be doomed – and knock down this wall while you’re at it.  Who’s got the money to do that? 

Well, some people have but expensive renovations are not necessary.  

A Feng Shui consultant can provide a range of solutions to a problem.  There are always options.  

 

  

Mumbo jumbo

Superstitious Feng Shui?

 

Mumbo-jumbo.  

“It’s not scientific” we cry.  

Actually, there is a lot of data from studies of our environment and its effect on us: colour, lighting, noise, electromagnetic frequencies.  Before such studies we relied on anecdotal evidence and beliefs.  Who knows what we will prove ‘scientifically’ a hundred years from now. 

By the way, do you believe in electricity?  Well, we don’t know how electricity actually works so that’s not scientific.  Maybe you should switch the kettle on for a cuppa and think about it. 

Jackie Notman is a copywriter, feng shui consultant and e-commerce retailer.  This article is from her blog ‘Life – and everything else’ where you’ll find an eclectic mix of articles and information. 

 This Feng Shui information is general for everybody. However, there are deeper levels of Feng Shui which take into account you and your specific environment.  

 If you would like to find out more about living in harmony with your environment, and using energy to your advantage, contact Jackie Notman on 07920 461574 or through her website www.fs168.co.uk 

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You have permission to publish this article as long as the tagline (above) with links is included and no changes are made to the article. A courtesy copy of your publication or link would be appreciated. 


How many toilets is enough?

I’ve been house hunting recently.  It’s not a serious search but I’m interested to see how the market’s picking up and I’m also incredibly curious.   I like to see inside people’s houses and, with my Feng Shui spectacles on I like to see the layout.  (Take note estate agents and realtors – include big, easy to see, legible floor plans.

Anyway, nosiness aside, I’ve been surprised by the amount of toilets that are put in new houses.  ‘Ensuite’ seems to be the must have closely followed by a ‘Guest Cloakroom’.  

Toilet

Treat toilets the Feng Shui way and be flushed with success

 

Now, I can understand the benefits of having multiple bathrooms when you’ve got a busy household trying to get ready for school or work in the morning.  I can also understand the luxury of having a bathroom all to yourself: you can soak in the tub, sing in the shower or read War and Peace for as long as you like.  And of course, for that unknown visitor who asks ‘can I use your loo’, the guest cloakroom is ideal because you don’t want a stranger wandering around upstairs do you? 

A few generations ago, at least here in the UK, the loo was a solitary affair and often located outside the house.  War and Peace wouldn’t have got a look in on a cold, frosty December morning.  But it hasn’t always been that way.  We have a long tradition of communal bathing brought to us by the Romans who used hot water, either from natural springs or heated, to supply central heating to buildings.  It is said that necessity spurned invention because the Romans found our weather cold and pretty hostile. 

For the Romans, bathing wasn’t the only communal activity.  I once visited a reconstructed Roman villa and the toilet, a fore runner of our modern composting toilet, consisted of a trench in the ground with a bench with 6 holes in it.  Community was important to the Romans at all times it would seem. 

But, all these watery sections in our modern houses make me a little uneasy.  In Feng Shui there are two schools of thought around water.  One is that it represents wealth and, if it goes down the drain then so does your money.  In my opinion it does represent wealth for some people but not for all.  However, the tips suggested are useful and can be implemented for another reason. 

That is simply that water represents energy.  If any of your bathrooms are in an auspicious section of your house then you don’t want that energy to be dissipated.  However, if the area is inauspicious then it’s a very good place to have a bathroom. 

This draining of energy can also have an effect on us if we spend a lot of time near a bathroom.  For example if we sleep in a room that has an ensuite. 

So there are some general rules with bathrooms: 

  • Keep the toilet lid down (men this means you!)
  • Try not to enhance the water theme with blue colour schemes, lighthouses, dolphins and buoys.
  • Instead use the element of wood to help drain the excess water energy.  This can be with green colours or leafy upward-growing plants.
  • Keep it clean.  This may seem obvious but any excess of energy will only exacerbate dirtiness.
  • Keep the door closed.  This is especially important if it is an ensuite.

In my perusal of houses for sale I’ve come across ensuites that are really part of the bedroom.  They’re either in an alcove or behind a screen and there is no door to close.  If you have this in your house try to find a way to fix a door or section it off.  You’ll benefit from the effort. 

There also seems to be some individually designed houses that feature the bath in the bedroom with no attempt made to call it an ensuite at all.  It’s a ‘feature’ I suppose. 

All I can say is NO, NO, NO.  It may look good as a picture in a glossy design magazine but just try living with it for a while and you’ll want to move that bath right out.  Your bedroom is your haven, sanctuary, boudoir, love-nest or whatever else you call it. You sleep in it to repair, refresh and rejuvenate yourself.  You may entertain in it too which is fine.  But your bathroom is about basic bodily functions, however well you decorate it, and basic bodily functions do not mix with sleep or romance. 

So, remember that toilets are good and necessary but don’t go overboard with the quantity and keep the ones you have clean, tidy and shut away if you want a ‘I practise Feng Shui’ gold star. 

Jackie Notman is a copywriter, feng shui consultant and e-commerce retailer.  This article is from her blog ‘Life – and everything else’ where you’ll find an eclectic mix of articles and information. 

 This Feng Shui information is general for everybody. However, there are deeper levels of Feng Shui which take into account you and your specific environment.  

 If you would like to find out more about living in harmony with your environment, and using energy to your advantage, contact Jackie Notman on 07920 461574 or through her website www.fs168.co.uk 

WANT TO PUBLISH THIS ARTICLE?
You have permission to publish this article as long as the tagline (above) with links is included and no changes are made to the article. A courtesy copy of your publication or link would be appreciated.


Money, Money, Money – The Feng Shui guide to improving your bank balance

A recent news article featured a man who had won over £175,000 on a William Hill jackpot game.  Just ten months before he had won £95,000 on the same jackpot game.  ‘Lucky guy’ you might say but he put it down to implementing changes to his home after a Feng Shui consultation.

The purpose of this article is not to advocate gambling you understand.  The purpose of this article is to consider how Feng Shui might improve your wealth and to offer some tips to get you started.

You’ve probably seen lots of things advertised that guarantee abundance: money trees, three legged toads and pyramids are just a few.  But there’s a huge difference between hanging up a charm hoping Lady Luck will notice you as she passes by and using Feng Shui intelligently to improve your life and let abundance in.

Feng Shui works by considering the energies of your home or workplace and how they interact with you as an individual.  But it’s not just about space.  Timing is also important.  Each one of us is living our own unique cycle.  So, where you are in your life will have an effect on your interaction with your environment.

Confused?  No need to be.  Feng Shui is not complicated, just multi-faceted.  Once you know the nature of the energies around and within you, the key is to live with those energies – enhancing the good ones and minimising the not so good ones.  And a good Feng Shui consultant will be able to advise you on how to do this.

However, there are some general things that you can do to attract the good stuff:

  • There are two wealth areas in your home or workplace that you need to be awDiagram of where to find the Wealth Cornerare of.  The first is the south east sector and the second is the top left area as viewed on a floor plan of your space with the main door at the bottom.
  • Clear clutter from these areas.  Clutter causes energy to stagnate which makes it thick, heavy and depressing.  What self respecting wealth would want to turn up in such a place?  Tidy things up and you make space for new energy and new opportunities.
  • Keep the areas light.  There are a number of ways you can do this: remove anything outside the window that is stopping the light coming in (such as overgrown trees or shrubs); clean the windows; change the curtains if necessary; if natural daylight is limited consider a permanent source of artificial light; use a light, bright colour scheme and furnishings.
  • To stimulate the energy in this area use a wind chime, aquarium or plants.
  • If using plants choose the traditional money tree/jade plant (crassula argentea) and keep it healthy.
  • If using an aquarium keep goldfish.  Their bright colours attract abundant energy.  Have at least three fish and, if more, keep them in multiples of three.  Keep the aquarium clean and the fish healthy.

Finally, you may be wondering what changes the guy who won the jackpots made which brings me to my final tip:

  • Keep the toilet seat down and the bathroom door closed.  This rule applies to bathrooms anywhere in the building but is especially important if the rooms are in the areas mentioned above.  Energy is drained very quickly in the bathroom as water is flushed or washed away and you don’t want to get rid of it before the magic has happened.

 

Jackie Notman is a copywriter, feng shui consultant and e-commerce retailer.  This article is from her blog ‘Life – and everything else’ where you’ll find an eclectic mix of articles and information.

 This Feng Shui information is general for everybody. However, there are deeper levels of Feng Shui which take into account you and your specific environment. 

 If you would like to find out more about living in harmony with your environment, and using energy to your advantage, contact Jackie Notman on 07920 461574 or through her website www.fs168.co.uk

WANT TO PUBLISH THIS ARTICLE?
You have permission to publish this article as long as the tagline (above) with links is included and no changes are made to the article. A courtesy copy of your publication or link would be appreciated.


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